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John Yim

I have been a sports artist since 1996, and in that span I’ve been fortunate in that my work has been associated with the likes of the Redskins, Hank Aaron, Jerry Rice, Barry Sanders, Peter Bondra and Jaromir Jagr to name a few. But it’s the countless many sports fans and collectors that I’ve had the pleasure of meeting from all over the country and all walks of life that ultimately makes the job rewarding.

John Yim on ETSY
John Yim on BlogSpot

Paola Luther A&M1

Paola Luther’s delicate touch and sense of light and color infuses her broad range of art styles and mediums.  Paola has been painting since childhood. As an adult she became a professional artist in fine arts and continues to expand her skills under the tutelage of artists from Washington DC, Los Angeles, Spain, Peru and Central America.  Paola has attended multiple workshops with talented artists around the world. Traveling is a large part of Paola’s artistic inspiration. She has produced colorful plein-air pieces, commissioned paintings and portraits.  Paola’s original works can be found in private collections in the United States and Europe.

paolaluther.com
paola@paolaluther.com

Jamea Richmond-Edwards

EDUCATION & TRAINING
Howard University- MFA Painting Spring 2012 Jackson State University – School of Liberal Arts Degree: Bachelor of Art in Art; May 2004
 Magna Cum Laude
 
ART RESIDENCIES
 555 Non Profit Gallery and Studios- Detroit, MI. June-August 2012 Art Residency
Tougaloo Art Colony- Tougaloo, MS. July 2003 Art Residency
 
SELECTED EXHIBITIONS
Solo Exhibitions 2017
Athena Shrugged (2) Long/Sharp Gallery New York, NY April 26 – June 17, 2017
2016
 Mosaic Project Pennsylvania College of Art and Design Lancaster, PA August 23-October 30, 2016
Take Me Away The Southern Gallery Charleston, South Carolina
2015
 The Cost of Making Her Run The N’Namdi Center for Contemporary Art Detroit, MI November 6- January 2, 2016
 

From CultureType.com:

“AS A YOUNG GIRL, Jamea Richmond-Edwards got lost in the pages of Ebony magazine. She was particularly drawn to the runway images from the Ebony Fashion Fair show. Through the otherworldly photographs of stunning black models styled in wildly imaginative ensembles, she discovered haute couture and envisioned herself as a fashion designer. Years later, she chose visual art over fashion design, but never gave up on her desire to explore the artifice of dressing.

“Those images were very visually affirming for me. It presented black women in a space that I had never seen before,” Richmond-Edwards told me via email………”

jamearichmondedwards.com

Peter Swift

Peter Swift is an award-winning contemporary realist artist.  his artistic philosophy is simple:  “I always paint common, everyday objects.  Using symmetry and design, I try to turn them into something new.  If the symmetry is successful, it will create a kind of dynamic stillness.  The painting will almost seem to absorb sound.”

Peter is a leading proponent of a developing new genre of still-life painting called “Magic Symmetry”.  Magic Symmetry is a combination of: (a) photorealistic renderings of objects; and (b) arrangement of these objects in symmetrical designs, such as circles.  Still-life symmetry is quite different from the traditional “slice-of-life” or “snapshot” approach, showing the objects on a table-top or in a cabinet, which has been used for centuries in still-life painting.  A good example of Magic Symmetry would be Peter’s painting entitled “Eight Wood Screws” shown above (acrylic on canvas, 48 x 48 inches, or 122 x 122 cm).

peterswiftartstudio.com

Elizabeth Stecher

“Watercolor does surprising things and is unpredictable, but sometimes spontaneous effects can be incorporated into the painting,” says Elizabeth. She chooses landscape subject matter based on her personal attraction which is typically mountains and Colorado scenery. While she often works from the photographs she takes when she travels, Elizabeth feels they do not capture the “interesting” part of the scenery. Because of this, she goes back and reinvents the initial attraction. Even though Elizabeth does not paint when she travels, she does compose sketches since it is easy to pack up. She seeks out scenery that creates interesting compositions for potential paintings. Her still life paintings are ordinary dayto-day subjects created from life such as food and shapes of environmental subject matters. At the end, she uses graphs to refine the painting. Elizabeth calls herself “compulsive” and a “perfectionist.” It is exactly these qualities that give her paintings a high degree of refinement and polish.”

Elizabeth Stecher

Millie Shott

Formerly called the Washington Water Color Club, the Washington Water Color Association is one of the oldest societies of professional artists and can trace its beginnings to the late 19th century.

Washington watercolorist and teacher, Marietta W. Andrews, originated the idea for such a society. The first meeting, March 28, 1896, was attended by 15 professional artists. The first exhibition, December 1896, had 134 works displayed at the Cosmos Club of Washington. Between 1897 and 1899, the Water Color Club exhibited at the Connecticut Avenue Gallery.

The exhibit of 1900 was held in the Hemicycle Room at the Corcoran Gallery of Art. In the years between 1921 and 1930, the WWCA held exhibits at the U.S. National Museum, the National Gallery of Art, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Howard University and the Arts Club of Washington.

In 1921, the name was changed to the Washington Water Color Association and the group became a non-profit, educational organization. By 1936, artists from the twenty-one states and the District of Columbia were displaying their works at the association’s exhibitions.

Among the well-known artists exhibiting works over the years were William Henry Holmes, Thomas Anshutz, William Merritt Chase, Joseph Pennell and American Impressionists Frank Benson and Chile Hassam.

In later years Elliott O’Hara, Andrew Wyeth, Don Kingman, Henry Gasser and Alice Pike Barney were among the painters exhibiting in annual WWCA shows. Alma Thomas, Delilah Pierce, Lois Mailou Jones and James Wells were among African American artists who exhibited regularly.

Internationally recognized artist Lily Spandorf was a member of WWCA until her death. Vienna-born and educated, Lily Spandorf made London her base of operations for several years, dividing her time between Britain and Italy, painting and exhibiting in both countries. She came to the United States at the end of 1959 and had a solo show in New York City. In 1960 she arrived in Washington, where she has had many solo exhibits.

Another WWCA member, Japanese artist Unichi Hiratsuka was one of the founding fathers of the Creative Prints movement (Sosaku Hanga) and one of the big names of twentieth century Japanese art. Hiratsuka is best known for prints in black and white. He died at the age of 102 years.

Activities

  • Juried member shows throughout each year. Sites vary according to availability.
  • Several meetings within a year to discuss club business and enhance knowledge through demonstrations and workshops.
  • Annual luncheon meeting in late spring to exchange ideas and get better acquainted.
  • Newsletter published periodically which includes information and a calendar of upcoming events.
  • Community service through contributions to educational institutions and art groups in the Washington metropolitan area. WWCA offers an annual scholarship for a deserving high school senior who plans to pursue a career in art.

Millie Shott

Kelly Posey

I am a painter first, and a teacher second. I have taught for 17 years, while raising two children. During most of that time I was a Sunday painter. But in the past few years, as my children have grown up and become more independent, I have been able to paint on a more regular basis, that has become routine for me now. And for the last two years, I have built up a body of work that I feel very proud of. 

I am an abstractionist that dabbles in the representational. Deep meditation and reflection on past works that I did in encaustics 20 years ago has given me new insight on the creation of painting and the process of brush stroke and color fields.  My investigations into this process have allowed my paintings, both past and present, to have an open dialogue with one another and a continuum.  My work has evolved, over time, from a highly narrative figurative style into abstract painting laced with symbolism. There is still narrative, but I want it to be broader. This work is speaking about energy in nature, and the subtle or strong forces working beyond the human realm. Some work deals with microorganisms and some deal with deep space. All deal with the beauty and dichotomy of those worlds in their complexity or simplicity.

kellyposeyart.com

 

Cecelia Laurendeau

At an early age I began to go beyond coloring and ventured into drawing and painting. The moment I uncapped my first tube of oil paint and squeezed out that brilliant buttery hue, I knew I was on a journey of artistic discovery. This natural ability was nurtured by my loving talented parents. They were not only lovers of art, music and the beauty of life, but were artists in their own right.  My Mom a soprano singer, fiber artist and poet, my Dad a builder, stained glass artist and photographer. It was not long before I would put a camera to my eye.

Real life images. The story that nature tells in the stillness of the landscape, the greatness of the ocean and the journey of the seasons. This is what excites my senses as an artist and my photographer’s eye at home and in my travels. Creating compositions in oils and pastels, my inspiration is drawn from my photographs. The creative process for me is re-visiting that place and moment in time. Remembering and feeling the emotion of the scene my lens captured and bringing it to life as a painting to be experienced and shared in a new way.

“Art is not what you see but what you make others see”. . . Edgar Degas

studio521art.com

Anita L. Albertson A&M1

What is Art?  To me, art captures something essential about life.

Art makes life bearable. It isn’t a luxury. Like our capacity for understanding, and our experience of love, it is a vitally important part of life.
–Gillian Pederson Krag

How does one share the charm and communicate the wonder of living, breathing and being? By using color, pattern, light, texture, style, angles, laughter, beauty, nature, industry, rigor, challenge, and words; then one weaves in the rainbow of emotions and experiences– all of which shine light on the magic and the drudgery of being.

To this point I have played with self-expression and aimed toward connective conversations in the margins of my life and the privacy and intimacy of my own home.  I am largely untrained, although I have had the benefit of some recent classes with some amazing and gifted artists.

Life has stages.  I have supported my children to grow and be and do and supported my husband as he has accomplished and achieved and is recognized for his talents.  I have weathered the declines and deaths of my grandmother, mother-in-law and parents.  These have been both difficult and amazing endeavors — greatly enriching my world and theirs.   Connecting me with all that has been, all that is now, and all that will continue after I cease to be.

Inside me is a calling to express, create, play.  I need to sit, think, write and design, uninterrupted and untethered.   Connecting with others on that path.  Sharing what is in me/what I can with those I know and with people I don’t know yet.  Growing.  Being.  Breathing.  Learning better how to express what needs to get out on paper.

I seek a community to help bridge my untrained enthusiasm into something more – at first for myself, but after a period of time, for and with others.

Working with a combination of mixed media – paper, acrylics, watercolors, pencils, pastels, fabric, yarn, pens and markers – I want explore the emotions and experiences of life.  My intention to start is to learn more about the craft of art by being in community with artists and pair my creations with poems, short stories or prose.

Eventually I would like to share these tools of self-expression with a wider range of children and adults in a relaxed, spontaneous way including those in marginalized communities seeking self-expression and through it, compassionate understanding.

 

Sharon Fox-Mould A&M1

Sharon Fox-Mould is a fine artist whose medium includes acrylic on canvas and photography. Sharon’s Hibiscus won second prize in UTRECHT 60th anniversary art competition in 2009.

Sharon Fox-Mould is a Past President of The Jamaica Guild of Artists and a proponent of the philosophy that artists working in community will build strong technical skills, strengthen their concepts and product delivery. A graduate of The State University of New York, Sharon double majored in Psychology and English. After living in the United States for 15 years and pursuing a career in administration and education she reacquainted myself with my Jamaican roots and began painting the flora of Jamaica. She has never given up her passion in life for painting.  Sharon’s chosen medium is acrylic on canvas but she often strays to furniture and walls.

“The many Jamaican artists before me who illuminated the richness of Jamaican life and light inspire me. Painting gives me the opportunity to share with you all that is beautiful. The interplay of colors that is nature, challenges me to devise ways to capture it on canvas. If you were to ask me what segment of any composition most interests me I would have to say color and light. Each painting represents first color and light followed by my love for gardening and the unusual flowers of the tropics.”

Sharon Fox-Mould has participated in many exhibitions mounted by the Jamaica Guild of Artists. As a guest of the National Museum and Art Gallery of Trinidad and Tobago and the Mayor of Port of Spain, she exhibited in “Celebration of Jamaican Art Exhibition”, which marked the anniversary of the twinning of the cities of Port of Spain, Trinidad and Kingston, Jamaica. Her paintings joined those of esteemed African American artists at the National Black Fine Art Show at the Puch Center in New York City. Sharon has also participated in the Columbia Arts Festival in Columbia Maryland as an invited artist. Her work is widely collected by individuals and corporations in Jamaica, United States and Canada, especially notable is the prestigious Pehl Collection in Eldersberg, MD, the Vincent D’Aguliar Collection in Nassua, Bahamas, and The Bank of Jamaica Collection.

Sharon Fox-Mould has served as Chairperson for the Management Committee of Visual and Performing Arts Jamaica (an EU backed cluster) Sharon, along with many leaders of the creative industries lobby and advocate for change. Her role in the creative industries is further highlighted by my participation in Jamaica Art Management Services. She wrote the proposal on behalf of the Guild who won a Caribbean Export Development Agency (CEDA) grant which documented thirty professional artists and created tax compliance status. For the first time in Jamaica Sharon was able use intellectual property of two artists as collateral for a loan. “I will continue to use my administrative skills to build on the legacy of my predecessors in promoting the richness that is Jamaican art. For me it’s really simple I enjoy creating pleasing, colorful, pieces.”

SharonFoxArt.com

Linda Cohen (In Memoriam 2018)

Linda was a treasured member of the A&M family. Her dedication to, and love of her practice, lives on in our hearts.

“I love the creative process of art which has always been a part of my life.  For many years,  I made silver jewelry with an interest in the texture and form of my pieces. About ten years ago I took up plein air painting – there is something so peaceful being outside and painting the moment. I am especially drawn to the elements of water and reflections.  I have taken plein air painting classes with both Glen Kessler, founder of Compass Atelier and Gavin Glakas, with Yellow Barn.  I have been taking portrait and figure painting with Gavin for the last 6 years which has proved especially challenging and rewarding.”

Elaine Boucher Burch Taylor

Biography:
B.A. in Fine Art, Boston College, Boston, Massachusetts
B.S.C.S. in Computer Science, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia
Study at Boston University, Harvard University, Montgomery College and Corcoran School of Art
Work as a software engineer and an artist

Highlights of Exhibitions, Collectors and Gallery Associations:
Washington International Art Fair II, III, IV and V
Paul Rosen Graphics, Washington DC
United States Information Agency, Central America
Spectrum Gallery, Washington, DC
New York Expo, New York, NY
Art Expo West, Los Angeles, CA
Strathmore Hall Foundation, Member, North Bethesda, MD
Strathmore Membership Juried Show 2007, Bethesda, MD
Strathmore Hall 25thYear Celebration Juried Show, Bethesda, MD
National Institutes of Health 2009 Juried Show, Bethesda, MD
Orchard Gallery, Group Show December 2010, Bethesda, MD
Orchard Gallery, Solo Show February 2011, Bethesda, MD
Strathmore Membership Juried Show 2012, Bethesda, MD
Resident Artist, Washington Art Works, 2015, Rockville, MD
Resident Artist, Artists and Makers II, 2016-Present, Rockville, MD

Publication:
Painting published by the United Nations for UNICEF card design; distribution started in 1983.

Techniques:
The paintings represent the harmonious coexistence of opposites: of complexity and simplicity;
Of show-it-all boldness and the mystery of concealed shapes;
Of brilliant colors and soft pastels; the artist is a Gemini.
The media used are oil or acrylic on canvas, acrylic on Plexiglas and gouache on rice papers.

ebbtaylor.com

Sue Fierston

I like to work in series and I’m in the midst of white-line woodcuts based on Yosemite National Park, where I’ll have my second arts residency in August 2017.

In painting, it’s an endless, fascinating puzzle to capture the effects of light on a microscope or a flower. Italian Wooden Microscope, seen here, is a watercolor from my solo show of historical microscope paintings on Yupo, a plastic surface, at the National Museum of Health and Medicine. 

My aim was to contrast the precise shapes of the microscope (all those circles) with the unpredictable flow of watercolor on plastic.

As a printmaker, I make images with woodblocks and with a walking press. I also make direct and indirect prints on paper from natural items, such as fish and leaves. I’m a member of the international Nature Printing Society and I’ll be teaching nature printing out of my studio here at Artists & Makers Studios.  

 suefierston.com 
 sue.fierston@gmail.com

 

 

John Dennis Murphey A&M1

Hi!  I’m John Dennis Murphey.  And yes, I’ve started using my middle name, Dennis.  There are just too many other rascals out there with the same moniker.  Note too, there’s an “e” in Murphey, which hopefully will further cement my identity!

Since 2000, I’ve had my own architectural practice called Meditch Murphey Architects.  So when I’m not architecting at my architectural office you can find me working away at my studio at Artists and Makers 2. 

My studio work is focused on the visual arts where I employ a variety of media – watercolor, acrylic, oil, pen, ink and graphite.   At the center of my work is my fascination with light and space, something I’ve also pursued in photography.

Recently I’ve taken photo workshops with Ira Block, Alex Webb, David Allen Harvey, Norman Mauskopf and others at the Santa Fe Photographic Workshop.  This spring I will be a Visiting Artist at the American Academy in Rome, trying to capture some of this great city’s spirit!

So with these three passions of mine, I have these three websites!

MurpheyMarks plays host to my mark-made images.

MurpheyWorks is all about images I’ve pulled through a lens.

Meditch Murphey Architects is a gallery of some of the projects I’ve helped design.

www.murpheymarks.com

www.murpheyworks.com

www.meditchmurphey.com

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